29th August, 2014

POC and Cultural Appropriation

lumpyspacedandy:

Guys, can we have a discussion about POC appropriating other POC cultures? Like when a Black girl wears a bindi. I personally don’t think it’s ok, but I want to know how others felt about it.

Why would it be okay? If an act if harmful or even just disrespectful, color is going to change that.

Bindis tho

(via Zaphod's just this guy, you know?)

28th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

I have a problem with an SJW, I was told that because I was white I should not speak Spanish because it was cultural appropriation. The problem is that I am Polish Argentine and Spanish was my primary language until I moved to the US. How should I deal with her because she does not seem like she knows that much about the history of Argentina.

If you can, ignore them. One, she is wrong. Two, if they doesn’t already know that and can’t be bothered to google they aren’t worth your time.

At some point people aren’t with arguing with anymore. 

28th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

I understand the bindi's and Native American head dresses, but dreadlocks? Can you explain that?

cemeterycigarettes:

"Dreadlocks originated first with Jamaican Rastafarians and then in Indian Sages and Yogis. Specifically it was started by holy men. These men renounced all of their worldly belongings (Including combs) and as a result their hair started (and remained) to turn into dreadlocks. In the beginning, it was actually something very beautiful to show that you’d given yourself and all that you possessed to GOD. 

Then, it turned into something ugly. When these holy people were seen by others, they were looked down on. Seen as less than because as they gave up all they had, that also meant they gave up their money. They were the poorest of the poor and the dreadlock became a sign of being poor, dirty and less than human.

This was an extremely spiritual symbol. It was not a fad or something people did to show their love of weed. 

As time went on, the Indian culture did not see anything terribly interesting about the dreadlocks. However, Jamaicans as well as those in the Caribbean thought otherwise. They believed that the dreadlocks were part of a religious lifestyle and actually considered the hair to be holy and powerful.

Dreadlocks are believed to have made it to the USA during the time of slavery. Both Black slaves as well as Indian slaves were captured and both brought this holy symbol and belief with them. 

For the ignorant that want to get dreadlocks because they are Bob Marley fans or because they “Like the Rastafarian lifestyle.” I say, FUCK YOU. Many of you believe that the “Lifestyle” you like so much is about “Relaxing and smoking weed.” Nothing could be further from the truth. As a matter of fact, if Bob Marley was any kind of representation for your wanting the locks in the first place, you know absolutely NOTHING about Bob Marley.

He was a truly spiritual man. His hair, his lyrics and the way he lived his life were representative of this. (Yes, he did some questionable things. That isn’t what this post is about thoughFor you to take a spiritual symbol and chalk it up to your love of weed, is not only appropriation, it is down right disgusting and cruel. There is this gross misconception that just because religion is a weapon, an afterthought or something to reference during political debate in this country that it is the same in others. IT IS NOT. Your actions are shameful and mean. You are acting disrespectfully and you have chosen to do so with no forethought or concern for who you are hurting.

This “Hair style” that you are choosing to believe is about sticking it to your parents, smoking weed, “loving” Bob Marley (even thought you clearly know nothing about him) or even about “Love and peace” is SO MUCH BIGGER THAN THAT. It is just not bigger than that TO YOU. It isn’t “That big a deal” TO YOU. That is how you know without a shadow of a doubt that you are in fact a bigoted cultural appropriator. You just don’t give a damn. Privilege and entitlement reign supreme. 

I have no respect or kindness for those that chose willful ignorance. It took me less than three seconds to find this information on Google. I don’t mean, it took three-ish seconds guys. I mean, I timed myself and found page after page after page of this information. I mean, I timed myself and withing those three seconds, I found more than one page that answered every single question I had.What is your excuse? You are CHOOSING to be a racist, bigoted, cultural appropriating piece of garbage. It is not okay.”

I don’t know how to attach a link on mobile so I just copied and pasted this, but it’s from http://racismschool.tumblr.com/post/18197850578/cultural-appropriation-dreadlocks this is also a great blog that I’ve learned a lot from. I think that this really sums up why it’s cultural appropriation.

I don’t feel like fighting about dreadlocks today. You can reblog from the dreadlocks tag, but I’m not doing any messages. You can just go straight to this post too. I just can’t let this pass.

This is so lazy. If you look at the top of the post they even took it back because that post is grossly wrong. They then try to argue that it is the use of the name dreadlocks that is the problem. 

If you want to take the position of dreadlocks as some kind of appropriation, there is better posts, better blogs and at least more factually correct sources to pull from. racismschool is not one to cite on this topic.

(via I'm Not A Role Model. I'm A Role Villian.)

28th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

I'm writing a story where the main culture is based pretty heavily on the Maori culture. I ant the characters to be able to have the traditional Maori-style tattoos, but I know people have a tendency to get angry over this particular cultural aspect. Do you know of any ways I could do this without offending anyone?

projectiscariot:

culturalappropriationon:

projectiscariot:

kaitiaki:

thewritershelpers:

You are correct, Maori tattooing, or Ta Moko, in particular has been very controversial. It started around 2007 particularly when a lot of fashion icons started using Ta Moko designs in their clothes. The problem with this being that the Ta Moko is sacred and has a religious aspect. In order to reconcile the sacred use of Ta Moko and the industrial demand a new style of design has come up called Kirituhi. This literally translates to “Drawn Skin” and is styled like the Ta Moko, but doesn’t use any of the sacred symbols or designs. It just looks like Ta Moko. So to answer your question I would look up examples of Kirituhi, and base your ideas off of that style.

Happy Writing,

-B

Correct answer I suppose, but tā moko do not have a religious aspect. They represent your family as well as important events.
The other month, a man got a full pū kanohi (full face moko) because his daughter died from cancer. He got the tattoo to remember her as well as to show that he will carry that pain all his life. So, not really religious at all. 

I would suggest looking into Lego’s brand Bionicle and how the company resolved issues with making their Maori based toy line respectful towards Maori culture.

I had not heard about this.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/1627209.stm

One of the really cool parts of this was that the Maori representatives didn’t bar Lego from using Maori words, but wanted to make sure that they were used accurately and respectfully, and Lego obliged. One of the good cases where cultural appropriation was dealt with civilly and still encouraged the spreading of that culture.

(via Meme Loving Fuck)

28th August, 2014

only1one1me:

Someone once told me that learning another language was bad because ‘cultural appropriation’, so I kindly told him in Spanish to ‘shut your mouth, stupid, and leave”. I’ve used my language knowledge to assist people in stores where I work. Should I tell those people that they shouldn’t learn English because they’re not from England? Technically, if that were true, I should be speaking Swedish and Cherokee right now.

It’s happening in real life now, god help us all. 

 

(via Rita Mugenjo)

28th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

I'm writing a story where the main culture is based pretty heavily on the Maori culture. I ant the characters to be able to have the traditional Maori-style tattoos, but I know people have a tendency to get angry over this particular cultural aspect. Do you know of any ways I could do this without offending anyone?

projectiscariot:

kaitiaki:

thewritershelpers:

You are correct, Maori tattooing, or Ta Moko, in particular has been very controversial. It started around 2007 particularly when a lot of fashion icons started using Ta Moko designs in their clothes. The problem with this being that the Ta Moko is sacred and has a religious aspect. In order to reconcile the sacred use of Ta Moko and the industrial demand a new style of design has come up called Kirituhi. This literally translates to “Drawn Skin” and is styled like the Ta Moko, but doesn’t use any of the sacred symbols or designs. It just looks like Ta Moko. So to answer your question I would look up examples of Kirituhi, and base your ideas off of that style.

Happy Writing,

-B

Correct answer I suppose, but tā moko do not have a religious aspect. They represent your family as well as important events.
The other month, a man got a full pū kanohi (full face moko) because his daughter died from cancer. He got the tattoo to remember her as well as to show that he will carry that pain all his life. So, not really religious at all. 

I would suggest looking into Lego’s brand Bionicle and how the company resolved issues with making their Maori based toy line respectful towards Maori culture.

I had not heard about this.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/1627209.stm

(via Meme Loving Fuck)

28th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

I'm writing a story where the main culture is based pretty heavily on the Maori culture. I ant the characters to be able to have the traditional Maori-style tattoos, but I know people have a tendency to get angry over this particular cultural aspect. Do you know of any ways I could do this without offending anyone?

kaitiaki:

thewritershelpers:

You are correct, Maori tattooing, or Ta Moko, in particular has been very controversial. It started around 2007 particularly when a lot of fashion icons started using Ta Moko designs in their clothes. The problem with this being that the Ta Moko is sacred and has a religious aspect. In order to reconcile the sacred use of Ta Moko and the industrial demand a new style of design has come up called Kirituhi. This literally translates to “Drawn Skin” and is styled like the Ta Moko, but doesn’t use any of the sacred symbols or designs. It just looks like Ta Moko. So to answer your question I would look up examples of Kirituhi, and base your ideas off of that style.

Happy Writing,

-B

Correct answer I suppose, but tā moko do not have a religious aspect. They represent your family as well as important events.
The other month, a man got a full pū kanohi (full face moko) because his daughter died from cancer. He got the tattoo to remember her as well as to show that he will carry that pain all his life. So, not really religious at all. 

(via kaitiaki)

27th August, 2014

“The first day when I was cleaning the latrines and the drain, my foot slipped and my leg sank in the excrement up to my calf. I screamed and ran away. Then I came home and cried and cried. I knew there was only this work for me.”

— Sona, Bharatpur city, Rajasthan, June 2013

(via humanrightswatch)

(via )

27th August, 2014

zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault
Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.
The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.
And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 
As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

zoeschlanger:

The Earth is Moving, And It’s Our Fault

Oklahoma has had more earthquakes this year than California. States are rumbling that barely did before. It’s becoming clear that humans are causing quakes through fracking-related injection wells, but plenty of people aren’t convinced.

The Earth, and the science of how everything works, is so big. We are so minute,” one Oklahoma state representative tells me. “For us to think that we have so much to do with these things is almost ludicrous.

And yet, injection-induced quakes are real. Why are we—at the level of our politics and at the level of our individual imaginations—unable to face this? 

As one USGS scientist puts it, “We’re kind of doing an experiment that we’ve never done before.”

(via ZOË SCHLANGER)

26th August, 2014

Anonymous asks:

What do you think of white women playing Asian characters like Suzie Wong and dressing up in Qi Paos ?

You may not be able to find a Chinese actress for a Chinese role, but you should come as close as you can

Please don’t ever Yellow face. That is never okay.

As for Qi Paos go read this article.  It offers multiple perspectives.  

25th August, 2014

tadpoletails:

For anyone who isn’t Japanese and wants to or will be in a situation where you will wear a kimono: it is NOT cultural appropriation.  As long as you don’t wear it in a demeaning or disrespectful way, there’s nothing harmful about it.  The same goes for lolita fashion.  And please pay no attention to asian bloggers who say that it is appropriation, since they’re all racist, perpetually angry idiots who blame white people for everything wrong in their lives.  I don’t speak for all Japanese people (no one does), however I am half-Japanese, born and raised, lived there for 18 years, and know MANY Japanese people, so I think I have a fuck of a lot more authority on this topic than white-guilt ridden teenage weeaboos.  

(via GROW SOME SKIN)

25th August, 2014

blackjackgabbiani asks:

Someone in the Animal Crossing tag was worried that they'd be attacked online because they had one of their villagers say "ni hao" as a greeting. And the worst part is that someone out there probably WOULD. That people are afraid to use foreign words shows that things have gone too far.

Ni Hao Kai-lan must be an abomination by that logic,

Sadly I can’t disagree that it might happen. I mean, it would be the fringe of the fringe going after that person for it, but that is a wild chance…I tend to be understanding of the people afraid of these kinds of things happening.

There is always comfort in knowing the other guy is wrong though.